SCIENCE

  • Heat Waves Deserve Disaster Relief from FEMA, Petition Argues

    Heat Waves Deserve Disaster Relief from FEMA, Petition Argues Places beset by heat waves should receive FEMA disaster funds just as those hit by hurricanes or flooding do, labor unions, green groups and public health advocates argue in a new petition By Thomas Frank & E&E News Workers harvest cantaloupe on a farm during a drought in Firebaugh, California, U.S.,…

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  • The Physics of Breakdancing, a New Olympic Sport

    The Physics of Breakdancing, a New Olympic Sport Breakdancing will hit the global stage at the 2024 Summer Olympic Games in Paris, and this physicist is excited to break down the science By Amy Pope & The Conversation US Lee of Netherlands competes in the men’s Breaking B-Boys final during the Olympic Qualifier Series for breaking, BMX freestyle, skateboarding, and…

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  • Clean Energy Spending Will Surpass $2 Trillion This Year

    Clean Energy Spending Will Surpass $2 Trillion This Year Investments in carbon-free energy will be twice as large as fossil fuel spending in 2024, the International Energy Agency predicts By Benjamin Storrow & E&E News Technicians from CP Solar work on the maintenance of solar panels at a partially solar-powered factory in the industrial area of Nairobi, on October 9,…

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  • Elephants Call Their Relatives by Name across the Savanna

    Elephants Call Each Other by Name Across the Savanna Female elephants address one another with individualized rumbles By Marta Zaraska Humans have a long history of inventing names for elephants. There is Disney’s Dumbo, of course, and Jumbo, a 19th-century circus attraction, and Ruby, a famed painting elephant from the Phoenix Zoo in Arizona. But new research suggests wild African…

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  • Why More Space Launches Could Be a Good Thing for the Climate

    The weather was mild on the evening of May 25 at the southern tip of the Māhia Peninsula in New Zealand. The wind was gentle, the sky was clear, and even conditions in the Earth’s upper atmosphere were calm. It was, in every way, a promising night for a rocket launch. And at 7:41 P.M. local time that promise was…

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  • Exotic Quantum ‘Bose-Einstein Condensate’ State Finally Achieved with Molecules

    Exotic Quantum State Achieved after Decades-Long Quest Molecular Bose-Einstein condensates could help to provide the answers to fundamental questions or form the basis of new quantum computers By Elizabeth Gibney & Nature magazine Velocity-distribution data for a gas of rubidium atoms before, during and after the appearance of a Bose–Einstein condensate. The peak forms as all the atoms occupy the…

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  • Fossils from an Ice Age ‘Tree Spa’ Discovered

    Ice Age ‘Spa’ Kept Trees Alive in Freezing Conditions Fossils from an ice age “spa” reveal a cluster of hot springs kept trees alive in the frozen Alps By Tom Metcalfe An ice age “spa” like the one shown in this artist’s conception may have existed long ago in what is now the Czech Republic. Illustration by Jiří Svoboda A…

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  • Antarctica’s ‘Doomsday Glacier’ Is Melting Even Faster Than Scientists Thought

    Antarctica’s ‘Doomsday Glacier’ Is Melting Even Faster Than Scientists Thought Warming waters are reaching several miles into Antarctica’s Thwaites Glacier—nicknamed the “doomsday glacier” because of its potential impact on sea-level rise By Sachi Kitajima Mulkey & Grist At the bottom of the Earth sits a massive bowl of ice you may know as the West Antarctic ice sheet. Each day,…

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  • The 2024 Hurricane Season Could Be a Dangerous One

    The 2024 Hurricane Season Could Be a Dangerous One The National Hurricane Center’s hurricane season outlook for the Atlantic Ocean forecasts 17 to 25 named storms in 2024 because of an expected combination of warm ocean temperatures and a La Niña climate pattern By Jhordanne Jones & The Conversation US In this satellite image captured by ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst…

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  • How the Guinness Brewery Invented the Most Important Statistical Method in Science

    “One Guinness, please!” says a customer to a barkeep, who flips a branded pint glass and catches it under the tap. The barkeep begins a multistep pour process lasting precisely 119.5 seconds, which, whether it’s a marketing gimmick or a marvel of alcoholic engineering, has become a beloved ritual in Irish pubs worldwide. The result: a rich stout with a…

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